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A practical tool for linking business or digital vision with goals, objectives, strategies and KPIs

What do you want to achieve and how will you get there? OGSM is a widely-used approach for getting focus to translate a vision into business and marketing strategy.

What is OGSM?

OGSM stands for objective, goals, strategies and measures. It's a way of defining what you want to achieve, and how you will get there. The model divides your aims into broad objectives, fixed and measurable goals, strategies to guide your actions, and measures to give you a direct way of monitoring your progress. Here is how the parts of the OGSM model link together. Here's a more specific definition of OGSM: Objective: Defining an over-arching breakthrough vision Stable, concise and linked to company mission Goals: Stepping stones to achieving the higher level objective Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Compatible Strategies: the choices we make to…

Do you know your 4Cs from your 4Cs? Read more about these two marketing models, plus find practical examples to apply to your marketing strategy

What is the 4Cs marketing model? Two groups of marketers have created the 4Cs marketing model. This often leads to confusion about what’s being discussed and where! Let’s clarify the two models:  The 4Cs to replace the 4Ps of the marketing mix: Consumer wants and needs; Cost to satisfy; Convenience to buy and Communication (Lauterborn, 1990).  The 4Cs for marketing communications: Clarity; Credibility; Consistency and Competitiveness (Jobber and Fahy, 2009).

Lauterborn’s 4Cs: Consumer wants and needs; Cost to satisfy; Convenience to buy and Communication

What is it? In 1990 Bob Lauterborn wrote an article in Advertising Age saying how the 4Ps (he didn’t address the 7Ps) were dead and today’s marketer needed to address the real…

A strategic digital marketing model of technology acceptance for those looking to bring about digital transformation

The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) is designed to measure the adoption of new technology based on customer attitudes. TAM is largely credited to Fred Davis in 1986, when he was part of the Computer and Information Systems, Graduate School of Business Administration at the University of Michigan in the US. Although there are now many variations of the model, the original Technology Acceptance Model is agreed as the following: This was at a time when computers were being introduced into the workplace and Davis was looking for a way to predict and explain system use both for vendors and IT managers. [si_monthly_campaign_blog_cta_banner id=156847] TAM states that the success of the new technology adoption is based on positive attitudes towards two measures: Perceived usefulness Perceived ease of use Its…

Tool for structuring thinking about one of the crucial 4Ps of marketing: The Promotion Pyramid

The Promotion Pyramid is a strategic marketing model digital marketers use to plan marketing activity in relation to the breadth of audience targeted and the resource required (financial and staff time). McCarthy's 4Ps of the Marketing Mix famously highlights 4 of the most crucial elements of marketing strategy: Price, Product, Place and Promotion. There is much discussion of the relevance of the 4Ps today which we cover here, but suffice to say we think these are still key strategy considerations for businesses of all scales - that's where the Promotion Pyramid comes in.

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When thinking about promotion online, digital marketers all too often try to rush into starting campaigns without properly analyzing the merits of different tactics and channels. The resulting approach wastes resources in the long run because the lack of a proper…

How to use the power of the 70:20:10 rule as a marketing model to prioritize your digital marketing strategy

With new marketing tools and techniques available to us almost daily, it can be difficult to know where to prioritize your marketing activities to get the most 'bang for your buck'. This is where the 70:20:10 rule can really help, since it's a simple device which helps us think through how we prioritize the time and budget we put into different marketing activities. As marketers, we need to be agile through reacting to new developments in order to gain an upper hand on competitors, but at the same time, we need to avoid being 'technology magpies' following seductive, shiny new tools which may distract us from working on optimizing the most effective channels. By splitting your spending or output into three differently sized areas, it helps you to identify priority areas, and…

Learn how the PESTLE analysis model can help you assess your business’ place in a variety of environments

PESTLE is one of a well-known series of acronyms used in business and marketing planning which summarizes how to review the broader forces, sometimes known as the 'macro-environment', that can shape a business.

What does PESTLE stand for?

PESTLE stands for:

Political Economic Sociological Technological Legal Environmental These are the contexts that a business should assess itself against to review competitors, markets, and the situation in which an organization finds itself. Environment Factors affecting a business - Source: Chaffey and Ellis-Chadwick - Digital Marketing, Strategy, Implementation, and Practice [si_guide_block id="65204" title="Digital marketing models guide" description="We rate PESTLE analysis as one of the top 20 marketing models which we feature in our digital marketing models guide. To learn about more models you can use to effectively assess your…

The 5Is model from Forrester can help to structure your digital marketing

Forrester is a well-established market research company focusing on business applications of digital technology and media and over the years, the team from Forrester have developed a number of models that we can apply to digital marketing. Occasionally they extract insights from their research and share in the form of a blog article. In 2007 they created a measure of engagement which was termed the 5Is although their focus was on 4 specific elements beginning with the letter ‘i’.

What are the 5Is?

The 5Is stand for the level of involvement, interaction, intimacy, and influence an individual has with a brand over time. The concept was based on research conducted by Forrester where they concluded that the traditional marketing funnel was dead and they proposed ‘engagement’ as a new metric. Engagement as a term had been discussed by many scholars as far…

An example of reviewing your marketing capabilities using the McKinsey 7S framework

The McKinsey 7S model is a useful framework for reviewing an organization’s marketing capabilities from different viewpoints. Developed by Tom Peters and Robert Waterman during their tenure at McKinsey & Company in the 1970s, this model works well in different types of business of all sectors and sizes, although it works best in medium and large businesses. The 7S model can be used to: Review the effectiveness of an organization in its marketing operations. Determine how to best realign an organization to support a new strategic direction. Assess the changes needed to support digital transformation of an organization.

What are the elements of the McKinsey 7S model?

In summary, the McKinsey 7Ss stand for: Strategy: The definition of key approaches for an organization to achieve its goals. Structure: The…

What can an ancient text do to help your digital marketing?

Sun Tzu's The Art of War is a widely studied piece of literature, so communicating its principles from reading it feels a little like learning to drive a car by watching a movie with a car chase in it. What I'd immediately remembered (from reading it 9-10 years ago) was that the book itself is short and powerful. Each chapter layers onto what was taught in an earlier chapter. Despite the title indicating otherwise, it's part science and part philosophy; it centres around the idea of winning without conflict, by competing based on position, not through 'warfare'. This is immediately powerful and relevant to marketers with experience in brand or marketing strategy. I think that you can summarise the whole book (very crudely) with two questions: How do I use information that is available to…

Three Go-to-Market models to help you strategize, plan and deliver

Business and marketing strategy is an essential component in the delivery of any successful product, service or promotional launch/campaign. We’ve written extensively at Smart Insights about the importance of defining a target audience, producing a clear value proposition and optimizing the right marketing mix; just three elements of good marketing strategy to help ensure brands create a competitive advantage, deliver value for customers and generate profit for the business. However, the success of any strategy is dependent on how this is ultimately executed and within this post, I’d like to look at a few different ways this can be brought to life as part of a Go-to-Market (GTM) plan. [si_guide_block id="21479" title="Download our Premium Resource – Business marketing plan guide" description="A marketing plan provides focus, defines the approaches to grow your market share, expand products or move into new markets and ensures you are…